Who coined phrase “Cold War”?

Philanthropist and financier Bernard Baruch coined the phrase "Cold War," first used in an address at the S.C. House of Representatives.

Philanthropist and financier Bernard Baruch coined the phrase “Cold War,” first used in an address at the S.C. House of Representatives.

On this date in 1947, the phrase “Cold War” was first used to describe the distrust between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Bernard Baruch, the famous financier and industrialist who advised U.S Presidents on foreign and economic policy, used the phrase “Cold War’ in an address to the S.C. House of Representatives. The occasion was the unveiling of a portrait honoring Baruch, a South Carolina native. The painting was to hang in the S.C. House of Representatives, and guests gathered for the event expected a brief talk from Baruch.

Instead, Baruch used the occasion to deliver a blistering attack on industrial labor problems in the United States.

“Let us not be deceived  — we are today in the midst of a cold war. Our enemies are to be found abroad and at home. Let us never forget this: Our unrest is the heart of their success,” he said, probably to the surprise of those in attendance.

The phrase immediately was seized by U.S. newspapers and magazines to describe the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union — a war without bloodshed, but a war that would be fought via diplomatic and international relations for decades.

 

 

 

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